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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Eat to live, live to eat's LiveJournal:

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Monday, April 20th, 2009
1:07 pm
[likethewatch]
Spring Food: Nourishing Traditions
I have been cooking up a storm. I have read Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon, for the first time. This is the bible of the Weston A. Price movement, and I had subscribed, for what it was worth, to their ideas, based on what I'd read, on the Foundation website but also on Beyond Vegetarianism. Finally reading what Fallon had to say about raw milk products, especially whey, made me want to run right out and get a gallon of raw milk from my local dairy farmer. I kept reading, and she kept on impressing me with the importance of adding whole categories of foods to my diet, or learning to enjoy them far more often, such as with organ meats, which I usually eat maybe once or twice a year in the form of chopped chicken liver.

Other foods that Fallon is just as emphatic about, are already in my diet. It was good to know exactly how bone broth is nourishing, and encouragement to continue making my own stocks and using them often to make soups and stews. It was time for me to make a big batch of beef stock, so I followed her recipe, which adds a little vinegar for extracting as much of the mineral as possible from the bones. I used apple cider vinegar, because I have some that is raw, organic, and unfiltered. Keeping the heat very low, and simmering it for an extremely long time--all weekend--were the other important steps. I knew from fine cooking sources that you have to keep the temp low on stock to keep it clear, and per the WAP people, and others, too, this preserves nutrients that can be destroyed by rapid boiling. Gelatin is the magic component of stock: it creates thickness, and is a "protein sparing" food. Fallon notes that gelatin-rich soups aid in digestion, explaining why they are often served before a meal.

This is good hot soup weather. Overcast, rainy days. Everything is blooming or trying to mate: the birds were so noisy and various this morning, they were cracking me up. My sinuses are killing me.

After I made the giant beef stock, I used some to make French onion soup. I topped it with baby Swiss and Gruyere, made buttered croutons out of commercial whole wheat sandwich bread. Kevin raved about this soup in his blog. He makes about three blog entries a year, so that's impressive. There's a little cheese left over after the soup was eaten, and we've been putting it on our scrambled eggs. Kevin thinks Swiss and its relatives are made for eggs. I prefer Cheddar cheese, find something oddly reeking about Swiss.

Since I already had so much chicken stock in the freezer, I decided to make a chicken soup next. I bought a whole chicken and stewed it in chicken stock, using the crock pot's probe to cook the chicken til it was done. I took the meat off the bones, put the meat and the stewing stock in a large pot with chopped carrots, celery, and leek, and simmered it all gently for a while. Then I added parsley and frozen spinach. In a separate pot, I heated some more chicken stock and cooked dumplings in it. The dumplings came out green because I put the ingredients from Bittman's butter dumplings recipe in a food processor instead of mincing the onion and herb, and mashing the butter with a fork.

I rediscover dumplings every year or so, make the same remarks about how my mother used to make a dumpling she called a "clunker." They were dense and bland. Until I talked about making chicken and dumplings with Kevin, I was going to put homemade egg noodles in the soup: I thought that was what it was. So I looked up Bittman's dumplings and made those, and they were green, and fluffy and sort of tasty. I don't think dumplings are supposed to be taste sensations.

x-posted to wholefoods, my journal
Friday, May 30th, 2008
7:49 am
[jess_faraday]
Miso
Someone recently posted about The Enlightened Kitchen, and once I flipped through it, I had to have it.

Problem is, I have a hard time sticking to the recipes! But here are a few of my riffs off the author's recipes that turned out really well.

(1) Miso Dip

Actually, I did stick to the recipe for this dip, only the recipe is for a salad dressing. I found it an irresistible way to down mass quantities of raw veg instead. Pictured: snow peas, daikon radish, carrots.

The dip: 6T rice vinegar, 3T red miso, 1.5 T honey (the recipe called for white sugar, but this worked out better.) Not the best recipe for people watching their sodium, but YUM.

miso_dip


(2) Fried tofu with wakame salad.

Wakame: soak 1/3 C dried wakame seaweed in cold water for 10 minutes to reconstitute. Dunk briefly in boiling water and drain. Coat in above-mentioned dressing. (The original recipe called for cucumbers and snow peas, but I didn't have any cukes.)

Fried Tofu: Drain a block of extra-firm tofu. Wrap in a clean towel and put something heavy on it (I used a carton of orange juice) and let it sit in the fridge for 1/2 an hour. (THIS, I've found is the secret to great fried tofu. It came from the book.)

Coat in a batter of flour, salt, pepper, and water. I also added a few drops of sesame and chili oils. Fry in very hot oil.

tofu_seaweed
Tuesday, May 13th, 2008
10:05 pm
[the_sybil]
Very good bread recipe
Soya and linseed loaf - very tasty, healthy, and with a lovely, soft, chewy texture. Also very good for making with kids - no long periods of kneading needed - a ten second knead is within the capabilities of even the most narrow attention span! I made it with three under-fives this morning, everybody had a turn helping, and they were fascinated by the way the dough rose!

The orginal recipe is here, but as I live in the US I converted it for US ingredients and measures. Revised recipe below:

1/3 cup quick-cook oatmeal
50g golden linseed (I didn't convert this measurement, as the packet of seed I bought was 56g. It was actually brown flax seed that I got from a Mexican supermarket, but googling convinced me that it was near as dammit the same thing. The recipe also works if you leave it out though - you just get a slightly wetter and stickier dough)
1 1/4 cup soy milk
1 1/2 tsp dried yeast
2 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup rye flour (recipe states that wholemeal flour could also be used)
1 1/2 tsp salt
olive or sunflower oil

Put the oatmeal and linseed in a large mixing bowl, stir in 100ml of boiling water and leave for 30 minutes to soften. Add the warm soy milk and yeast, and mix well. Measure out the two flours and the salt, add these to the soy mixture, then stir everything together into a big, soft and sticky dough. Cover and leave for 10 minutes, then knead on a lightly oiled worktop for about 10 seconds. Cover and leave for another 10 minutes. Repeat this knead-and-rest sequence twice more at 10-minute intervals, then leave covered for 30 minutes.

Brush the inside of a deep, 19cm long loaf tin or similar with oil. Roll out the dough into a rectangle about 2cm thick, roll it up tightly and squash it seam-side down into the tin. Cover with a cloth and leave somewhere warmish for about an hour and a half, until doubled in size.
Preheat the oven to 220C (190C fan-assisted)/425F/gas mark 8, slash the top and bake for about 45 minutes (mine only took 1/2 hour). Take the tin out of the oven, remove the loaf from the tin, and leave to cool on a wire rack.
Wednesday, April 16th, 2008
9:47 pm
[the_sybil]
A damn good meal
Moroccan Vegetable Pilaf

Not sure if this is still a pilaf, as I substituted the rice in the original recipe for couscous. But it was really good. If you need actual measurements (I tend to wing it when I cook things like this), the recipe I loosely followed is here.


Ingredients
couscous
ground cardamom(½ tsp?)
ground cinnamon(½ tsp?)
low-sodium vegetable stock
raisins
cooked chickpeas/garbanzo beans
olive oil
red onion, thinly sliced
garlic cloves, crushed
ground cumin (½ tsp?)
harissa (maybe ½ tablespoon for two people?)
carrots, thickly sliced
dried apricots, roughly chopped
Grated rind of one orange
red pepper, cored, deseeded and roughly chopped
chopped tomatoes (just one tomato was enough for the two of us, the tomato flavour should not overwhelm)
flaked almonds
chopped fresh coriander/cilantro
Freshly ground black pepper
salt to taste

Prepare the vegetables. Heat the oil in a large saucepan, add the red onion and cook for 5 minutes or until beginning to soften. Add the garlic, cumin and harissa and cook for a further minute.
Add the apricots, carrots and red pepper to the pan and stir. Add some stock and bring to the boil. Add black pepper to taste, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
Add the chickpeas and tomatoes and cook for a further 10 minutes or until the vegetables are just tender.
Place couscous, raisins, cardamom and cinnamon in a bowl. Add boiling stock (consult packet for amount) cover and stand for five minutes. Fluff with a fork and stir in salt and orange rind.
Place couscous in serving bowl and top with vegetables. Sprinkle over almonds (toast them first if you can be bothered) and coriander.


And I know its possible to buy harissa, but I didn’t know where to look, so I made some.

Harissa

1 tblspn vegetable oil
1 large red pepper, finely chopped
3 red chillies, deseeded and chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground caraway
2 tablespoons tomato puree (this means concentrated tomato puree like you get in the UK. In the US I used part of a can of tomato paste)
salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat oil in large, heavy bottomed saucepan. Add all ingredients except salt and pepper and cook over medium heat until pepper has softened. Add ½ pint water and bring to boil. Simmer 10 mins, puree in a blender until smooth, then return to saucepan and reduce to a thick paste. Freeze in ice cube trays for handy portions when needed.
Tuesday, February 26th, 2008
1:59 pm
[jess_faraday]
Baked Tofu
Wow, looks like the last entry was almost exactly a year ago...and I made it!

Anyhow, speaking of things I've made, this afternoon, I made baked tofu, one of my favorite snacks. I love to have it on hand for when I get the urge to munch something, and it's both less expensive, and tastier (imo) than the store-bought variety.


baked_tofu


I slice a block of extra-firm tofu into fingers, then marinate it in the following:

3/4 C low sodium soy sauce
1/4 C balsamic vinegar
1 t sesame oil
1-2 drops white truffle oil (or chili oil, depending on my mood)
ground black pepper to taste

I've marinated for as little as 2 hours, or as long as overnight. It all tastes pretty good in the end.

Cooking time: 20 min. on a medium broil setting, turning the tofu over halfway through. I use a greased cookie sheet.

It's good hot or cold, on rice, in a sandwich, or just by itself!

Current Mood: hungry
Thursday, March 15th, 2007
8:34 am
[jess_faraday]
Barley & Chickpea Curry
xposted to food_porn


A recent conversation with a friend inspired me to start trying to cook with different kinds of whole grains. Toward this end, I picked up some barley at the grocery store. I was delighted to see that it's incredibly nutritious (low calorie, high fiber, high protein, low fat), and even more delighted with the taste: mild, with a texture that can be called almost, but not exactly, crunchy.

glicky's post from yesterday gave me the basis for a variation on the chickpea curry that's a favorite in our house. There aren't any pics, though, because it went too fast!

Barley:

1/2 C dry barley provided a large serving for two. It would probably provide a modest serving for four, but we were hungry.

Bring 6 cups of water to boil. Add barley. Simmer, covered, for 1/2 an hour, or until tender.

Curry:

1 teaspoon each: cardamom, cumin, cinnamon, curry, chopped garlic
2 pinky-finger sized jalapeno chiles, diced
1/2 C nonfat plain yogurt
1 can garbanzo beans, with water
2 T olive oil

Heat spices, garlic, chiles, and olive oil in a large frying pan. Add garbanzo beans, with water, and cook for 5 minutes or so. Add yogurt.

The cooking time varies, depending on how long it takes us to get the kids to bed so we can enjoy it =) but usually isn't longer than 10 minutes or so.

Serve over barley.

Current Mood: full
8:39 am
[lovemonster]
Searching for a Homemade Enchilada Sauce (and taco seasonings)
I can make a killer tomatillo enchilada sauce (green), but I've been using a pre-packaged kind for the red enchilada sauce and the taco seasonings, one that my hubby just loves.

Now I've been a good little food pornista and I've done a bit of reasearch and found several different red enchilada and taco seasoning recipes, but I'm looking for _your_ tried and true one.

My only other request is that it tastes as close to the packaged-store-bought products (or better!), either that or there may be a mutiny at the lovemonster household!

Thanks everyone... appreciate any and all feedback!
x-posted
Wednesday, February 28th, 2007
4:52 pm
[wicked_sassy]
food porn
I've started photographing the food I prepare and putting it online. If you'd like to check it out, the pictures can be found here.

Cheers!
Wednesday, January 31st, 2007
11:02 pm
[wicked_sassy]
i made a salad that was good

salad yums salad yums
spinach salad with a handful of defrosted frozen corn, chopped celery, half a chopped shallot, half a chopped tomato, tossed sesame seeds, prepared chik'n strips

Saturday, November 18th, 2006
4:34 pm
[seattlejo]
Thanksgiving Day
So how healthfood pornolicious is your Thanksgiving going to be?

My Thanksgiving feast has grown from 0 to 6 in about a week so I'm just now working on menu development. And I want it to be healthy. I've thumbed through Cooking Light and Eating Well and have a few recipes that look interesting.
I'm thinking that plenty of options is the best way to go, particularly with the diverse crowd I will have.

I'm thinking fresh veggie trays, beautiful green salads, both brussle sprouts and a second veg. A smaller amount of mashed potatoes and stuffing this year. Dessert will have a fruit option as well as the pies that have been requested.

So inspire me! What are you doing?
Tuesday, October 31st, 2006
12:34 pm
[lovemonster]
Sunday, October 29th, 2006
12:21 am
[precia]
Savings for you!
I know it's not food, but this could just get you a fancy new toy for creating something lovely.

I've got a 25% off coupon from Linens N Things (everything from kitchen supplies to home decor) for you all. Unfortunately, it's only good for today (Sunday). I really should have posted it some time ago, but after the first few days of submitting my address, I kept forgetting to check that email account.
Read more...Collapse )
Feel free to spread it around (which also would have been better done before the coupon became active). Stores should be open 10-6.
Monday, August 21st, 2006
5:59 am
[clubmix1996]
Thursday, July 27th, 2006
9:29 am
[jess_faraday]
Recipe Site
Some of these recipes look amazing:

FatFreeVegan.com

(xposted to jess_faraday)
Saturday, June 24th, 2006
11:17 pm
[likethewatch]
camping tripCollapse )
Since returning from our camping trip, we've both had to play catch-up, at home and out in the world: shopping, laundry, extra hours at work, and the like have interfered with our cooking. Hair cuts and an emergency trip to the grocery made us miss the fish shop's closing time, so we ate out on Thursday; the meal using fresh fish we'd planned for that night was modified to use frozen and served Friday.

Here's the meal plan. The grocery list follows.

the meal planCollapse )
To cook all of this...
the grocery listCollapse )

x-posted to various foodie communities, including wholefoods which I moderate, and some that I'm members of: gastronomique, healthfood_porn, and grocerylists.
Thursday, June 15th, 2006
11:49 pm
[bruiseblue]
Menu Plan June 17 - 23
My first attempt at this - please advise if I'm not doing this according to community standards!

Breakfast at my house (of two adults) is usually cereal and fruit, yogurt, and the occasional scambled egg on toast. Lunch is usually carried to work in the form of leftovers, or failing that, peanut butter sandwiches on multigrain bread, veggie sticks, yogurt, granola bars (homemade if I make time), cheese and crackers, or whatever looks good about the fridge and pantry.

We favour quick meals, for which I can prep on the weekends. I do go all out for dinner parties, and love to cook -- just not after a long day at work. We spend $120/week on groceries, but that includes cat food and supplies, toiletries, cleaning stuff, paper goods, medications, etc. About $40/week is spent in the produce department, and $10/week at the bakery. I maintain a well stocked pantry, as well, of baking stuff and spices, but also staples such as pasta, rice, noodles, etc. I try and make as much of my own dressings, sauces and flavourings as possible, but will rely sometimes on pre-cut veggies, pre-washed salads, and other such timesavers. I pick my battles, knowing I can't possibly do everything, so I cheat in ways I find acceptable.

Dinners:

Friday: Grocery shopping night, restaurant dinner

Saturday: Beef and Broccoli over noodles (for husband) and brown rice (for me - I keep a stash of cooked rice in the freezer).

Sunday: Pasta with Asparagus (Pasta, asparagus, olive oil, parmesan cheese). Salad.

Monday: Mixed baby greens salad with warm wild mushrooms and chevre (balsamic dressing).

Tuesday: Chicken and/or black bean quesadillas w/ tomato salsa. Veggie sticks (peppers, carrots, celery, fennel).

Wednesday: Pizza (homemade dough, simple tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, mushrooms, spinach and black olives. Salad. I always use the dough recipe from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything (the whole wheat variation). It always turns out perfectly with a minimum of fuss.

Thursday: Red lentil soup with spinach (curry flavour), salad.

Treats, which I make on the weekend when I have time to play in the kitchen: Peanut butter bars from the Rebar cookbook, Chocolate Chip cookies for hubby (who works hard and deserves a treat, even if he won't embrace the whole natural foods thing, and I'll eat them warm from the oven), chocolate cake for a friend's birthday party (with cherries, whipped cream, and chocolate curls), and banana-chip granola bars (adapted from the Whole Foods for the Whole Family cookbook, and suitable for lunches).

With my bountiful pantry in place, and having been to the organic market yesterday, our shopping list looks like this:

Strawberries, Salad mix, melon, garlic, wild mushrooms, tomatoes, crimini mushrooms, milk, butter, flour torillas, mozz cheese, jack cheese, chevre, chicken for roasting, 3-4 black olives from the deli, kosher salt, almonds for snacking, bran flakes, curry powder, bottled water, frozen spinach, fresh spinach, salsa, dish soap, kitchen sponge, allergy meds, and cat food. On Sunday we'll get bread from the bakery, and possibly a treat as well. I'll prep the veggies and roast the chicken and make the pizza dough on the weekend, so that dinner prep is always under half an hour. I'll probably make the soup in advance too, even though it's only about half an hour as-is.
3:37 pm
[bruiseblue]
What I had for dinner last night (and will have tonight)
This is a hurriedly thrown together sort-of copy from something in the Nava Atlas 5-Ingredient Vegeterian Gourmet cookbook... which I changed quite a lot to match what I wanted to eat and what was in my fridge: (all amounts highly variable):

Warm potato salad with baby greens, asparagus and chevre
Lightly toss mixed baby greens in balsamic vinaigrette and cracked black pepper.
Top with: warm potato salad and asparagus (boil baby new potatoes until cooked, toss in fresh asparagus for the last minute of cooking. Drain both together and immediately toss in balsamic vinaigrette.)
For Garnish: sprinkle liberally with soft goat cheese (I used local soft chevre).

5-Ingredient Vegetarian Gourmet calls for tossing the potatoes in vinegar and oil (but I had dressing pre-made on hand), and suggests using feta or chevre. The asparagus isn't part of the original recipe at all. She has several similar salads: one with potatoes, goat cheese, and balsamic dressing, one with asparagus, mushrooms and balsamic dressing, and one with mixed wild mushrooms and just a sprinkle of balsamic - they're all so good, all on the same theme (warm vegetables with tangy dressing over baby greens salad). Organic mesculun mix was on sale for $5.50/lb, which is less than what a quarter pound usually costs. I couldn't resist.

I had some for lunch today, cold, and it was very good. Potatoes are good cold, if they're well seasoned. I used the baby new potatoes (called 'Nugget Potatoes' here in BC).

Tonight's menu: Cheese tortellini with fresh spinach and parmesan cheese (Cook the pasta, toss with spinach to wilt, moisten with some reserved pasta water and a dash of good olive oil, top with pepper and wide paper-thin gratings of parmesan cheese. I'm going to put basil in tonight, as I bought a huge handful of organic basil yesterday - it smelled so good I had to take it with me.
Wednesday, June 14th, 2006
8:12 pm
[doctor_mama]
What we're eating for supper this week
Monday: Trader Joe's Nasi Goreng with added tofu and veggies
Tuesday: Annie's organic whole wheat mac & cheese for Primo and Seconda, leftover Nasi Goreng for me
Wednesday: Fish tacos--grilled halibut steaks, corn tortillas, shredded cabbage mixed with yogurt, lime juice and smoked paprika
Thursday: out
Friday: some kind of chicken grilled or smoked, grilled(?) potatoes, sauteed green beans, homemade whole wheat challah

Has anyone grilled potatoes?
Tuesday, June 13th, 2006
9:48 pm
[likethewatch]
Last Saturday's grocery list and this week's meal plan
For the past several weeks I've posted my grocery list on grocerylists and my weekly meal plan on healthfood_porn, but unlike with my personal journal, I feel like not many people are connecting enough with my posts to want to comment. I'm self-conscious about posting my grocery lists and meal plans because I'm well aware that I spend a lot more on groceries than the average person. I'm comfortable with how much we spend on food: that's not the problem. I don't want to look like a conspicuous consumer. But I don't eat this way to show up the guy who eats Campbell's soup and hamburgers. I love what we eat and want to inspire other people to spend more on their groceries, too, because I think it's worth it to buy fresh, sustainably produced food: it's worth it for our health, and for the pleasure in eating fresh, well-prepared food, and for having a passion for what sustains us. The details matter.

The reason I started to post our grocery lists and meal plans wasto have an archive of what I eat over the course of the year. I wanted to be able to mine meal plans from the same season a year ago, for ideas on what to make for dinner. I hoped that by participating in food communities, I would also get to read other people's lists for inspiration. But people have stopped posting their lists on grocerylists and I'm not sure healthfood_porn is the most appropriate place for my weekly lists of meals, although it's not exactly off-topic: I think most of what we eat qualified as health food porn. As I typed this, Kevin was broiling lamb shoulder chops that he marinated with mustard, lemon juice, rosemary and oil for our dinner, along with roasted baby potatoes and a simple salad of mixed greens from the CSA,. Before I came in here I finished off the strawberries he picked Monday at the CSA pickup. They were small and tart, and had a distinct strawberry flavor.

I wish there were a graceful way to crosspost besides the cut-and-paste method. I'd like to start crossposting this to wholefoods, the community I moderate. Maybe I'll hit all three this week, get some cross-pollination going, and after that just post in my own journal, or whichever community seems to want my weekly obsessive food check-in.

Yeah, that one.

the shopping listCollapse )

And the meal plan. We're going camping on Friday! Yay!

Meal planCollapse )

x-posted to healthfood_porn, grocerylists, wholefoods, and my journal.
Thursday, May 25th, 2006
9:26 pm
[glitterydonuts]
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